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thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Era Projectile Discovered in Local Landfill
This Civil War era military projectile was discovered in the St. Andrew’s Landfill  by county employees. State and military bomb technicians safely neutralized the device. (Photo: Md. State Fire Marshal)  Further investigation determined the shell, which measured 16 inches long by 8 inches round was a civil war era projectile. The round was safely moved to a remote area where military bomb technicians, in conjunction with bomb technicians with the State Fire Marshal’s Office Bomb Squad, safely countered charged the round. 

thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Era Projectile Discovered in Local Landfill

This Civil War era military projectile was discovered in the St. Andrew’s Landfill  by county employees. State and military bomb technicians safely neutralized the device. (Photo: Md. State Fire Marshal)  Further investigation determined the shell, which measured 16 inches long by 8 inches round was a civil war era projectile. The round was safely moved to a remote area where military bomb technicians, in conjunction with bomb technicians with the State Fire Marshal’s Office Bomb Squad, safely countered charged the round. 

Posted 1 year ago with 24 notes (via thecivilwarparlor , org. thecivilwarparlor )
 #historic  #St. Mary's County
dracadancer:

Oyster fleet in Baltimore Harbor, Md., ca. 1885. Ships’ masts dominate the foreground; buildings, horse-drawn wagons, and carts visible through them. 22-CE-178.

dracadancer:

Oyster fleet in Baltimore Harbor, Md., ca. 1885. Ships’ masts dominate the foreground; buildings, horse-drawn wagons, and carts visible through them. 22-CE-178.

Posted 1 year ago with 4 notes (via dracadancer , org. dracadancer )
 #historic  #maryland  #baltimore  #1885  #vintage  #19th century  #ships
american-tragedies-deactivated2 asked : Southern Maryland all the way!

Yes. :) 

(Picture of the ship “The Dove” at historic St. Mary’s City, MD in St. Mary’s County— the first region of the state to be settled, back in 1634, and considered the birthplace of American religious toleration.) 

hokendauqua:

Smith Island Maryland

hokendauqua:

Smith Island Maryland

Posted 1 year ago with 2 notes (via hokendauqua , org. hokendauqua )
 #smith island  #maryland  #somerset county  #historic  #1940s  #scene  #photograph
Farm Landscape, Bolivar Road, Washington County, Maryland by cbustapeck on Flickr
The National Road was the first major improved highway to be funded by the federal government. Construction began in 1811 in Cumberland, MD, and reached all the way to Vandalia, Illinois before the Panic of 1837 cut off funding. In the 1820s, a network of private turnpikes extended the road to Baltimore. This extension came to be known as the National Pike, or the Washington National Pike. 

Farm Landscape, Bolivar Road, Washington County, Maryland by cbustapeck on Flickr

The National Road was the first major improved highway to be funded by the federal government. Construction began in 1811 in Cumberland, MD, and reached all the way to Vandalia, Illinois before the Panic of 1837 cut off funding. In the 1820s, a network of private turnpikes extended the road to Baltimore. This extension came to be known as the National Pike, or the Washington National Pike. 

Posted 1 year ago with 3 notes
 #washington county  #maryland  #farm  #landscape  #cows  #road  #national road  #historic
Posted 1 year ago with 0 notes
 #Maryland  #Historical  #Marker  #History  #Historic  #sign  #Elk Ridge Landing  #Elkridge  #geotagged
Cator Print 168: Market Street, Baltimore, 1850 by Enoch Pratt Free Library on Flickr.Via Flickr:
A view of “The Museum Print” on MDCH.org: collections.mdch.org/cdm/ref/collection/cator/id/70
Description, with paragraph breaks added: 
“Colored lithograph by E. Sachse & Co., one of two prominent lithography companies in Baltimore during the mid-1800’s, that features a view of Market Street in Baltimore, and frequently called the Museum Print. One of eight known copies, it is considered one of the best executed, most interesting and rarest of American colored lithographs. The view represents Baltimore Street, looking west from Calvert. 
A guide book of the period says, “The principal street is Baltimore Street, formerly called Market Street, which name is still retained by many persons. This is the chief location for dry-goods and fancy stores, and is the principal promenade. Baltimore has long been celebrated for the beauty of its ladies, and if the visitor should happen to traverse this thoroughfare on a fine afternoon… he will be able to decide for himself whether the City is entitled to the reputation she enjoys for female beauty.” 
The Baltimore Museum and Gallery of Fine Arts was built in 1829 by John Clark, lottery broker, on the site of old frame buildings dating from Baltimore’s earliest days. Clark bought three lots for a total of $27,200. Soon after the building was erected the upper floors were rented by Rembrandt Peale, who had previously sold the original Peale Museum on Holliday Street to the City for a municipal building. Among his curiosities were stuffed birds, reptiles, animals, wax figures, and pictures. There was also a small theater where, after Peale’s occupancy of the building ended, stars such as Junius Brutus Booth, Joseph Jefferson, J. W. Wallack, and John E. Owens appeared. 
At the time this picture was made the theater was conducted by Owens. Among the numerous successive owners of the building and theater was P. T. Barnum, the showman. The structure was demolished in 1874 to make way for the Baltimore and Ohio Building, which preceded the Emerson Hotel on this site. Colvin & Co., occupying the corner office, conducted lotteries, while Armstrong & Berry in the adjoining shop were purveyors of books and stationery. 
Beyond, at No. 168, was the book store and publishing establishment of Fielding Lucas Jr., and at No. 170 the silverware and jewelry shop of Samuel Kirk & Son. The tall building at the left of edge of the picture is the new structure known as Carroll Hall, on the site of the present Mercantile Trust Building. Containing offices, lecture and exhibition rooms, this was a costly building for the time. The clothing store on the ground floor was that of A. Phillips & Co. who display on the pavement a couple of old leather trunks, while a man’s coat is hung high over the window. 
Across Calvert Street is the watch and the jewelry shop of Robert Brown and Sons, above which William Woody conducted his printing shop. Among the dozen different types of conveyances are a carriage, omnibus, covered wagon, gig, dray, stage-coach and handcart. The omnibus marked “Pennsylvania Ave.” represents the earliest effort at organized street transportation. The first of these lines was established in 1844 and flourished until tracks were laid for horse cars in 1859. 
Because of its unique interest and the beauty of its workmanship, especially its colors, this print has often been reproduced. This copy is a fine example of the original, and is mounted in Sachse’s distinctive fashion.”
——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
Permission to reproduce or publish this item is required and may be subject to copyright, fees, and other legal restrictions imposed by parties outside of the Library. The Enoch Pratt Free Library is not responsible for the outside use of these images but is committed to the responsible and legal use of any content posted on its web site. Any questions regarding the legal nature of content on this site may be referred to copyright@prattlibrary.org.

Cator Print 168: Market Street, Baltimore, 1850 by Enoch Pratt Free Library on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
A view of “The Museum Print” on MDCH.org: collections.mdch.org/cdm/ref/collection/cator/id/70

Description, with paragraph breaks added:
“Colored lithograph by E. Sachse & Co., one of two prominent lithography companies in Baltimore during the mid-1800’s, that features a view of Market Street in Baltimore, and frequently called the Museum Print. One of eight known copies, it is considered one of the best executed, most interesting and rarest of American colored lithographs. The view represents Baltimore Street, looking west from Calvert.

A guide book of the period says, “The principal street is Baltimore Street, formerly called Market Street, which name is still retained by many persons. This is the chief location for dry-goods and fancy stores, and is the principal promenade. Baltimore has long been celebrated for the beauty of its ladies, and if the visitor should happen to traverse this thoroughfare on a fine afternoon… he will be able to decide for himself whether the City is entitled to the reputation she enjoys for female beauty.”

The Baltimore Museum and Gallery of Fine Arts was built in 1829 by John Clark, lottery broker, on the site of old frame buildings dating from Baltimore’s earliest days. Clark bought three lots for a total of $27,200. Soon after the building was erected the upper floors were rented by Rembrandt Peale, who had previously sold the original Peale Museum on Holliday Street to the City for a municipal building. Among his curiosities were stuffed birds, reptiles, animals, wax figures, and pictures. There was also a small theater where, after Peale’s occupancy of the building ended, stars such as Junius Brutus Booth, Joseph Jefferson, J. W. Wallack, and John E. Owens appeared.

At the time this picture was made the theater was conducted by Owens. Among the numerous successive owners of the building and theater was P. T. Barnum, the showman. The structure was demolished in 1874 to make way for the Baltimore and Ohio Building, which preceded the Emerson Hotel on this site. Colvin & Co., occupying the corner office, conducted lotteries, while Armstrong & Berry in the adjoining shop were purveyors of books and stationery.

Beyond, at No. 168, was the book store and publishing establishment of Fielding Lucas Jr., and at No. 170 the silverware and jewelry shop of Samuel Kirk & Son. The tall building at the left of edge of the picture is the new structure known as Carroll Hall, on the site of the present Mercantile Trust Building. Containing offices, lecture and exhibition rooms, this was a costly building for the time. The clothing store on the ground floor was that of A. Phillips & Co. who display on the pavement a couple of old leather trunks, while a man’s coat is hung high over the window.

Across Calvert Street is the watch and the jewelry shop of Robert Brown and Sons, above which William Woody conducted his printing shop. Among the dozen different types of conveyances are a carriage, omnibus, covered wagon, gig, dray, stage-coach and handcart. The omnibus marked “Pennsylvania Ave.” represents the earliest effort at organized street transportation. The first of these lines was established in 1844 and flourished until tracks were laid for horse cars in 1859.

Because of its unique interest and the beauty of its workmanship, especially its colors, this print has often been reproduced. This copy is a fine example of the original, and is mounted in Sachse’s distinctive fashion.”

——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Permission to reproduce or publish this item is required and may be subject to copyright, fees, and other legal restrictions imposed by parties outside of the Library. The Enoch Pratt Free Library is not responsible for the outside use of these images but is committed to the responsible and legal use of any content posted on its web site. Any questions regarding the legal nature of content on this site may be referred to copyright@prattlibrary.org.

Old house in Westminster, MD by garyhymes on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Carroll County, Maryland, USA. - Baltimore Blvd / Route 140 & Bethel Road

Old house in Westminster, MD by garyhymes on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Carroll County, Maryland, USA. - Baltimore Blvd / Route 140 & Bethel Road

Posted 1 year ago with 11 notes
 #Baltimore  #County  #Baltimore County  #old house  #peeling  #historic  #antique  #tree  #birds  #oak  #sky  #Carroll County  #Carroll  #Old  #tin  #roof  #shingles  #paint  #porch  #shrubs  #grass  #shutters  #awesome  #Maryland  #Westminster  #Rural  #Reisterstown  #140
Posted 2 years ago with 7 notes
 #Annapolis  #MD  #historic
caboose- by Russ Bradshaw on Flickr.

caboose- by Russ Bradshaw on Flickr.

Posted 2 years ago with 3 notes
 #Ellicott  #city  #maryland  #historic  #district  #russ  #bradshaw  #main  #street  #train  #caboose  #B&O  #railroad
Posted 2 years ago with 9 notes
 #Youghiogheny  #River  #HDR  #garrett  #county  #maryland  #friendsville  #stream  #creek  #historic